The oldest dawn song: Phebi claro nondum orto jubare

 

 

Phebi claro nondum orto iubare

Fert aurora lumen terris tenue:

Spigulator pigris clamat: «Surgite!»

 

 

L’alb’apar, (t)umet mar at ra’sol;

po y pas, a! bigil, mira clar tenebras!

  

En encautos ostium insidie

Torpentesque gliscunt intercipere,

Qus suadet preco clamat surgere.

 

 

 L’alb’apar, (t)umet mar at ra’sol;

po y pas, a! bigil, mira clar tenebras!

 

 

Ab Arcturo disgregatur Aquilo,

Poli suos condunt astra radios,

Orienti tendit Septentrio.

 

 

L’alb’apar, tumet mar at ra’sol;

Poy pas, a! bigil.

 

 

Phoebus shineth e’er his glory flyeth,

Aurora drives faint light athwart the land,

And the drowsy watcher cryeth,

                                                “Arise!”

REF: –

Dawn light, o’er sea and height, riseth bright,

Passeth vigil, clear shineth on the night.

 

They be careless of the gates, delaying,

Whom the ambush glides to hinder

Whom I warn and cry to, praying,

                                                                 “Arise!”

REF: –

Over cliff and ocean white dawn appeareth,

Passeth vigil, and the shadows cleareth.

 

Forth from out Arcturus, North wind bloweth

Stars of heaven sheathe their glory

And Sun-driven, forth goeth

                                                Settentrion.

REF: –

O’er sea-mist and mountain is dawn disply’d,

It passeth watch and maketh night afraid.

Translated by Ezra Pound, 1905

 

Phebi claro nondum orto iubare

Fert aurora lumen terris tenue:

Spigulator pigris clamat: «Surgite!»

 

L’alb’apar, (t)umet mar at ra’sol;

po y pas, a! bigil, mira clar tenebras!

 

En encautos ostium insidie

Torpentesque gliscunt intercipere,

Qus suadet preco clamat surgere.

 

L’alb’apar, (t)umet mar at ra’sol;

po y pas, a! bigil, mira clar tenebras!

 

Ab Arcturo disgregatur Aquilo,

Poli suos condunt astra radios,

Orienti tendit Septentrio.

 

L'alb'apar, tumet mar at ra’sol; 

Poy pas, a! bigil.

 

With pale Phoebus, in the clear east, not yet bright,

Aurora sheds, on earth, ethereal light:

While the watchman, to the idle, cries: ‘Arise!’ 

 

Dawn now breaks; sunlight rakes the swollen seas;

Ah, alas! It is he! See there, the shadows pass!

 

Behold, the heedless, torpid, yearn to try

And block the insidious entry, there they lie,

Whom the herald summons urging them to rise.

 

Dawn now breaks; sunlight rakes the swollen seas;

Ah, alas! It is he! See there, the shadows pass!

 

From Arcturus, the North Wind soon separates.

The star about the Pole conceals its bright rays.

Towards the east the Plough its brief journey makes.

 

Dawn now breaks; sunlight rakes the swollen seas;

Now, alas! It is he! 

Translated by A.S. Kline, 2009

 

REFERENCES

Anonymous. “Phebi claro nondum orto iubare.” Latin-Provencal text, 10th century. wikisource

Anonymous. “With pale Phoebus, in the clear east.” Translated by A. S. Kline. Poetry in Translation, 2009. Free online.

Moody, David. “Phebi Claro by Starlight.” Modern Language Review 76.4 (October 1981): 769-79. 

Pound, Ezra. “Belangal Alba.” Ezra Pound Poetry and Prose. Contributions to Periodicals. Eds. Lea Baechler, A. Walton Litz and James Longenbach. New York: Garland, 1991. I: 4. 

 

 

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